All posts by thirteenfingers

Atelier Versace – Spring 2015 Couture

Versace’s latest collection obeyed and caressed the female figure, made up of flowing shapes that followed the curves of the woman it dressed. Donnatella’s cuts, and many a cut-out, were bending and asymmetric templates placed to accentuate and boast about the body, in a bold and zero-fuss palette of black, white, red and blue.

The show began with aesthetically simple looks that focused entirely on silhouette, not an embellishment to be seen. Block colour power suits and jumpsuits alike were finished with billowing flared legs, which balanced the female form and secured her purposeful, strutting feet to the ground. Halter necks cupped busts and wide, buckled belts emphasised waists. The solid colours and outlines made a strong and statuesque woman; astral queens.

It was only until quite a way into the collection that Versace introduced beading, adding some glimmering movement, but this quickly went from subtle to spilling like gowns of glistening oil. The beads began to morph themselves into the structures of the clothes and engulfed them whole, sewn in lines and grids, showing off flesh like a mesh of second-skin. As well as floor-length pieces baring all, there were mini dresses paired with knee-high boots, making this collection the epitome of hot, haute sex appeal.

By the final quarter of the show, Donnatella was giving us pieces with a potent dose of both her focuses combined: the geometric cut-out, the cascading shape of the female form, in equal parts to glossy, figure-hugging blankets of twinkling beads. Versace has created goddess-worthy gowns for Spring 2015. The paradox is that, whilst following the natural contours of the body, this couture collection has gone to a rather celestial, space-age place.

Images from style.com.
Click on the images to view all 47 designs.

Current Mood: 8th January 2015

We are only a week into 2015 and already dreaming of summer. Blame Spring/Summer collections being released in December and January.

Hot and sticky beach getaways, white bikinis against tanned skin, chunky gold jewellery and lush red lips, cocktails and fresh limes, high heels with mini skirts and shorts, salty, rolled hair, oversized sunglasses, black lashes coated in thick waterproof mascara, bright and shining finger and toe nails, drinking in the balmy evenings after drinking in the heavy heat.

Screen Shot 2015-01-08 at 20.10.53

guess-spring2011-2guess-spring2011
Guess Campaign Spring 2011

tumblr_n2v86a40UK1qzh0vno1_1280

Screen Shot 2015-01-08 at 20.05.41

Male Mentality: style versus trends

Style versus fashion, the endlessly asked question, the challenge of pin-pointing exact meanings of each. The distinction between the two vague and expansive words is becoming evermore important, even obvious, to the modern man, and was only confirmed by the SS’12 collections of Men’s Fashion Week.

Catwalks were littered with sophisticated tailoring, but the genius was in the evolution of the classic piece. Twists of detail converted the garments into quirky yet still absolutely wearable art, answering the calls of the contemporary man who begs for subtle individuality that isn’t too androgynous, but neither is it clumsy. Gucci kept a sporty silhouette beneath the defined jackets and ankle-swinging slacks. There was a deliberate focus on oversized, sturdy bags and suitcases, and thick-soled, slip on shoes: both vital in the fast-moving world of today. These accessories brought the collection into the current moment for the ‘en vogue’ male.

Colours were another means of modernisation. Enrico Coveri threw zinging lime greens onto the lapels of all-white jackets, whilst Cavalli contrasted the white with a palette of rich, majestic hues. All the while, they stayed true to the enduring aura of the wardrobe staples, the necessities. Philipp Plein and Armani were mixing the well-known, casual rock tee with throw on suits; rolled up trousers and buttonless blazers toned down formality. DSquared2 on the other hand refined the slouch and stuck to slim structuring and minimalistic decoration, finished by the skinny tie.

Burberry was the beautiful antithesis of the week. Whilst ensuring a modern and wearable collection, the clothing simultaneously had an antique feel, induced by the patchwork designs on shirts and earthy colour palette. Thick fabrics boasted durability. The aesthetic of the collection was set in the past, in mountains and Nordic survival, yet the functionality of the collection was never more suitable for what one needs to survive today. Christopher Bailey explained, “I wanted to celebrate the idea of craftsmanship. I love the whole digitalisation of the world. But I don’t think one has to be at the expense of the other.”

Bailey neatly leads us to the brief summarisation of the ‘style versus fashion’ debate for the male consumer, who appropriately prefers all things done succinctly: trends are fickle, quality and style are timeless. And men enjoy the practicality and permanency of that guarantee. We understand that the growing availability of cheaper, lesser quality clothing on our high streets reflects the current societal pace. Post-millennia life is quick moving with a throw away attitude, characterised by the Internet in particular, where brands must update their stock as quickly as the bloggers update their site with the latest freebie, resulting in an age of ‘fast fashion’. Yet just when it’s believed that no other subtlety could possibly be thought up to enhance a wardrobe staple, in this immense abyss of design and consumption, another slight of hand produces something new. The fashion world is not yet prepared to let quality slip in order to keep up with the fast pace of the 21st century. Certainly for the modern man, it is the high street having trouble keeping up with the catwalk.

PUBLISHED by FUSSED MAGAZINE (now obsolete) in JANUARY 2012
Featured image credit